Did you know…that Northeast Florida has had eight flags?

Florida-based author, Michael Wiley, gives us a brief, but fascinating overview of the history of Amelia Island.

Did you know that since Europeans first landed in the New World, Northeast Florida, the setting of the Daniel Turner thrillers, has had eight flags—more than anywhere else in the United States?

In 1562, Jean Ribault raised the French flag on what was then populated by the Timucuan Indians and is now Amelia Island. Five years later, the Spanish knocked the flag down and raised their own, which flew until the British conquered and claimed the island. When the American Revolutionaries kicked out the British, the island returned to the Spanish.

That’s when things got messy. In 1812, a bunch of guys calling themselves the Patriots of Amelia Island booted out the Spanish and put up a flag of their own. Sobering up the next day, they raised the U.S. flag. But Spain protested, and back up went the Spanish flag.

Everything seemed pretty much up for grabs, and so in 1817 the Scottish soldier Sir Gregor MacGregor captured the place and put up his own Green Cross of Florida standard. And then some Mexicans and a pirate wrested the island from MacGregor and raised the Republic of Mexico rebel flag. The U.S., objecting to the affront, grabbed it back and held it in trust for the Spanish. That lasted until 1821, when Florida became a U.S. territory.

The island was under the U.S. flag at last.

Until it wasn’t.

At the beginning of the Civil War, the Confederate flag flew over the island, coming down again in 1862, when the U.S. flag went up again for good—or at least for now.

Praise for Michael Wiley:

BLUE AVENUE

“Wiley is extremely good at creating an atmosphere of menacing dread. . . New shocks occur all the way to the last page—and continue as readers reflect on what they’ve just witnessed.” Publishers Weekly Starred Review

“The Shamus Award–winning author of the Chicago-set “Joseph Kozmarksi” series (A Bad Night’s Sleep) introduces an intriguing antihero in this excellent noir that will attract readers who appreciate the anguished protagonists of Steve Hamilton and Loren D. Estleman.” Library Journal Starred Review

BLACK HAMMOCK

“No one will stop reading, so hypnotic is Wiley’s writing” Booklist 

 “An amazing Southern Gothic tale of revenge. A crime tale well told” Florida Times-Union

For more information on the Daniel Turner series visit our website.

 

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